In Wake of EMV Switch, US e-Commerce Fraud Soars!

Payments Specialist, Risk Specialist

As the US switched to EMV chip cards system, e-commerce fraud rates jumped by 33% last year, according to Experian. In late 2015 the US finally followed much of the rest of the world when Visa and other card schemes switched the liability for fraud-related losses to retailers that have not upgraded their hardware for EMV.

Experian notes that the increase in e-commerce fraud follows a similar trend pattern from countries that previously rolled out EMV cards – UK, France, Australia, and Canada – that also saw gradual increases in card-not-present fraud.

“We suspect that the EMV liability switch and increased adoption by merchants of chip-and-pin enabled terminals have had a profound impact on driving up e-commerce attacks,” says the firm.

Fraudsters that typically relied on committing counterfeit fraud have shifted their focus to the digital channels where they could have more success, and as more attackers enter a rapidly growing mobile and online commerce space it becomes increasingly difficult for merchants to spot them.

This means that businesses need to expect the increase in e-commerce fraud to continue over time and to be prepared to deal with it by employing a multi-layered approach that pairs transactional data elements with details about the user and their device.

Experian says that the biggest component of credit card fraud trends is the fact that 2016 was a record year for data breaches. There were 1,093 breaches, a 40% increase from 2015, according to the Identity Theft Resource Center.

Meanwhile, the Federal Trade Commission recently revealed a jump in consumers who reported that their stolen data was used for credit card fraud, from 16% in 2015 to more than 32% in 2016.

The record number of data breaches is a signal that future fraudulent activities will take place, warns Experian.

What Bill Trueman, an Eminent Risk Specialist Says About This:

1. Of course e-commerce fraud will rise. It is rising everywhere as e-commerce and m-commerce get used more.

2. Naturally, if you stop fraudsters using cards at the point of sale with EMV, they will move to CNP.

3. If you do not put in protections in your CNP channel, fraud will rise.

4. USA fails to adopt (or plan for) protections in the e-commerce channel.

5. The late adoption of EMV in the USA, has caused a lot more data compromises for longer in this market.

6. EMV adoption is starting to see fraudsters deterred from CO fraud opportunities already as they move to other softer targets.

Bill Trueman is an eminent independent payments and risk specialist helping business and bank owners manage risk & fraud and save millions. He is director of globally well known RiskSkill, and UKFraud and is an active member of a worldwide fraud and risk advisors organization i.e. AIRFA.

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